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Safety Tips to Help Protect People and Pets from Heatstroke
May 03, 2019
With temperatures rising and the start of summer just around the corner, it is important to remember that the heat is a danger to all of us, especially to children, the elderly and animals left in hot cars.


With temperatures rising and the start of summer just around the corner, it is important to remember that the heat is a danger to all of us, especially to children, the elderly and animals left in hot cars.

Did you know that “in just 10 minutes, the temperature inside your vehicle can reach deadly levels”? (Source: nhtsa.gov)
 
Safety Suggestions (Provided by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration):
  • Never leave a child in a vehicle unattended—even if the windows are partially open or the engine is running, and the air conditioning is on
  • Make a habit of looking in the vehicle—front and back—before locking the door and walking away
  • Ask the childcare provider to call if the child doesn’t show up for care as expected
  • Place your purse or briefcase in the back seat to ensure your child isn't accidentally left in the vehicle
  • Write a note or place a stuffed animal in the passenger's seat to remind you that a child is in the vehicle
  • Teach children that a vehicle is not a play area and store keys out of a child's reach
  • If you see a child alone in a locked car, get them out immediately and call 911
  • A child in distress due to heat should be removed from the vehicle as quickly as possible and rapidly cooled
Pets are similar to humans as they can succumb to the dangerous temperature conditions just as easily. It is wise to plan ahead before you leave your house with your children or animals to run errands. 
 
Media reports seen across the nation and compiled by San Jose State University, Department of Meteorology and Climate Science show:
  • In 2018, 52 children died in the United States from vehicular heatstroke related deaths.
  • Average number of U.S. child heatstroke fatalities per year since 1998: 38

If you see a child that is left in an unattended or unsupervised vehicle please report it to law enforcement immediately by calling 9-1-1. Anyone who sees an animal in distress locked in a hot vehicle should immediately call 9-1-1 as well.

 
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